Transformative step of the day

Lets become serious and start the "Durban Initiative - Concerned countries moving ahead", 2°C - 2t CO2/Capita in 2040

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http://www.worldbioenergy.org/content/let%E2%80%99s-get-serious-about-possibilities-reach-2%C2%B0c-target

alternatively: www.worldbioenergy.org

Step taken by:

NGO: World Bioenergy Association

Located in: Sweden

Kind of step

Initiative/commitment/Side-event @Cop 17

Submitted by:

NGO: World Bioenergy Association

Located in: Sweden

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Lets become serious and start the "Durban Initiative - Concerned countries moving ahead", 2°C - 2t CO2/Capita in 2040

E-reading: Smart access to information

We often use a lot of natural resources even in situations where we no longer need to do that. For instance, the service “written information” can be provided in a way that makes it available for use by nine billion people. We used to read what Wired magazine now calls “dead forest books”, but e-books are becoming mainstream, together with e-versions of magazines and office documents.

The devices for e-reading often give the reader everything an old book provided, plus many other features. It allows users to be more active, e.g. to share and edit, and it provides support for the reader, such as help with translations and further information. Old books put pressure on the planet, not only because there is a need to cut down forest to make a paper book, but also because of all the energy and resources required to transport and store the old books.

With e-readers it is possible to provide everyone on the planet with instant access to the world's accumulated knowledge in a way that physical books can never deliver. It is important to make sure that the e-readers are sustainable over their lifecycles and that they are multifunctional devices. Open systems that allow all relevant formats to be read are also important.

Nature’s temperature: Biomimicry and the case of enzymes

Nature is a lot smarter than our current technology in many areas. Instead of using high temperatures and brute force, a combination that large parts of the old industrial economy are based on, we can use connectivity and knowledge to learn from and mimic nature. Getting rid of dirt or removing particles that are unwanted can be done in very resource efficient ways if we learn from nature.

Around the world nature is making materials that are stronger and lighter that those we use today. Dirt and particles are removed though processes developed over Millions of years. Nature can do all this without toxic chemicals or the need for high temperatures. Behind such smart solutions you will often find enzymes; these function as organic catalysts that can help achieve very significant efficiency gains.

Increased collaboration, but also new business models and an increased planning horizon, can enable a new smarter production and consumption system. Though strategic investments and initiatives, we can pave the way for a bio-based economy.

Smart lighting: Let there be sustainable light

Control, design, and new high-quality LEDs can ensure sustainable lighting system solutions. The possibility of planning for a building’s lighting and controlling when light is needed can help reduce the need for electricity for lighting. Today about 19 percent of the world’s electricity is used for electric lighting; add kerosene lamps and other non-electric lights, and it is easy to understand that our current way of providing lighting is one of the greatest sources of greenhouse gases.

New solutions are however already available and beside being up to 80% more efficient new LEDs also allow us to provide light in fundamentally different ways. While CFLs provided a more energy efficient version of the incandescent lamp LEDs open up totally new opportunities to provide the light we want.

LEDs are also enabling much smarter systems, e.g. with batteries and solar panels, around the world. Today these systems are quite marginal, but with smart planning, smart control and a focus on transformative solutions zero carbon lighting systems could become mainstream in the next years both in the developing and the developed world.

Virtual meetings: sharing ideas and knowledge

Today’s technology for virtual meetings is so advanced that many people who use state-of-the-art technology forget that they are not physically in the same room. In a global world where the need for interaction between different groups is increasing, virtual meetings play an important role. In a not too distant future there may not be any travel agencies, only meeting agencies (where the default suggestion is a virtual meeting, and a physical meeting is booked only if necessary).

A new generation is collaborating as researchers, entrepreneurs, and activists cross traditional borders to address global challenges in ways that would have been difficult, or even impossible, only a few years ago.

International conferences and negotiations without the hassle of always flying are only the beginning. Soon it may be common to (once again) engage in conversation with the farmer who grew the food you bought and with anyone who has been involved in producing the items you buy.

Virtual meetings may have started as a smarter way to do conferences, and this shift alone has resulted in significant reductions of GHG emissions, but virtual meetings could also help accelerate sustainable production around the world by increasing transparency.

Smart city farming: Vertical instead of horizontal

In many areas, we keep doing things the same old way, not because that’s the best way but because we’ve created habits and structures that hold us back. In a world with rapid urbanization and with new technologies there is an opportunity to grow food in unconventional ways that support food security, reduce the need for transport, and provide fresh and nutritious food.

With new knowledge, high-rise buildings around the world could become important providers of food, both in standalone structures dedicated to food and in buildings with other uses, such as apartments.

Besides helping to reduce unnecessary transport, vertical farming — and smart city planning that includes food production — can help people become more aware of the need for a circular economy and re-connecting with nature.

Experience: A good life in the 21st century

With increased transparency and access to data it will be easier for citizens to choose ways that increase their quality of life without putting too much pressure on the planet. While we can make things a lot better, and even shift to new, much smarter ways of doing things, it is also important to ask what we actually want and need.

Teleworking: Smarter work done where you want

Much of today’s information and material can be stored in the "cloud" to allow access from any mobile device. Teleworking does not mean "work-at-home" and is not just something for rich office workers in cities. It is the possibility of working wherever is best and avoiding travel when you can get access to documents and information without it.

Many farmers in poor countries can save a lot of time and resources by getting access to information without having to travel to a city far away. Anything from legal documents to help with pesticides can be done with the help of mobile technology.

Today there is no need to keep investing in an infrastructure based on the assumption that every person must move from the home to a physical office every day. Moving a car or other vehicle not only requires a lot more energy, it also requires an underlying infrastructure that is energy intensive.

Teleworking allows people to get things done in a much smarter way. Not only does this save time, money, and energy directly, teleworking also promotes investments in an infrastructure that is very resource efficient.

Smart buildings: turning the biggest problem into the biggest opportunity

Buildings are maybe the single biggest climate challenge, but also potentially the biggest opportunity. Buildings have traditionally not been very smart, but converging technologies along with intelligent control systems can allow buildings to become net producers of renewable energy.

Instead of a society where buildings generate about 40% of CO2 emissions, buildings could become part of the solution by not only looking to reduce the emissions, but rather becoming passive buildings that are net producers of renewable energy.

Many different stakeholders and solutions must come together to deliver such a paradigm shift. New materials, better design software, lower prices on renewables and increased connectivity provide us with an opportunity to allow new clusters to be created. Such clusters can already today deliver buildings that are an integrated part of the solution, rather than merely slightly less of a problem.

Resilient agriculture: With nature and part of the global market

Resilient agriculture could play a very important role, not just for GHG reductions but also for poverty reduction. Examples already exist where smart organic agriculture, though intensified soil carbon sequestration and compost, can actually help remove carbon from the atmosphere and have a net climate positive impact over the lifecycle. The more we eat such food, the more we reduce carbon in the atmosphere.

Smarter planning and better information to end-customers about climate positive food could help accelerate the uptake of resilient agriculture. It is also important to plan long-term, as fertile soil is easily lost but hard to gain.

Green Commuting: CANGO Green commuting fund (6 December)

Zhe, Limeng, Liang, Zheng Ding, Ye Receiving the transformative step of the day

The green commuting initiative has already delivered important transformative change in the area of transport/mobility.

By bringing government, business and NGOs together in different projects, from high-level pubic events such as the Beijing Olympic and the Shanghai Expo, to engagement use smart ICT technology the project have encouraged the use of transformative low-carbon solutions.

The initiative is particularly interesting, as it created China’s first online platform, “5iGreen”, for personal voluntary carbon emissions reductions.

New smart city solutions in the area of transport/mobility are necessary to ensure low-carbon development. The Green Commuting participation at COP17 is an example of the kind of concrete work that can help the negotiations forward.

3GF: Public Private Partnerships for green growth (7 December)

The step "Public Private Partnerships for green growth" is supporting transformative solutions in the following four ways:

  1. By setting up a new innovative public private partnership with focus on transformative solutions that can deliver a zero carbon economy and linking it to key processes like the EU presidency and G20 in a open and transparent way.
  2. By acknowledging and having a strong focus on companies as solutions providers as well as including the gains (not just the costs) during the transition to a low-carbon economy.
  3. By approaching leading countries as solution providers for the world with export of smart solutions what is needed. (We expect 3GF will look at the net impact to ensure that reduction in domestic emissions are not moved, but actually solved).
  4. By linking the need for a strong binding global framework with leadership in smaller groups.

China’s Policies and Actions for Addressing Climate Change (8 December)

On behalf of Su Wei, National Development and Reform Commission NDRC, Mr Tian Chengchuan, Division Director, Department of Climate Change, (NDRC) received the diploma for Transformative step of the day

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Coordinator

Cooperating partners

Full GeSI members - continued

Full GeSI members - continued

Supporters - continued

Transformative step

This is anything that supports accelerated uptake of transformative solutions.

A step can be a text suggestion for a negotiation, a side-event where an initiative is launched, a speech highlighting the need for transformative solutions, a concrete change in legislation or an investment.

A transformative step can be taken by any stakeholder.

Transformative Solution

Transformative low-carbon solutions are solutions that transform business models and/or allow countries to leapfrog past carbon emitting technologies.

These solutions often provide emissions reductions of 80% or more compared with business as usual and often depend on an underlying energy-efficient broadband infrastructure.

Transformative solutions can also help turn problems into opportunities.

Examples of problems turning into opportunities include buildings that are net producers of renewable energy, zero emitting electric transport solutions that also serve as back-up storage and base stations that produce renewable energy.

FAQ

Q. What is the Transformative Step of the Day initiative?

A. An initiative which aims to increase focus on transformative low-carbon solutions and how they can be supported in the negotiation process. The initiative will be facilitated by a mobile app and web portal and live events to launch the initiative and announce the winning transformative step.

Q. What is a transformative step and why is it important?

A. A transformative step can be a solution, activity or policy decision that supports transformative low-carbon solutions. These steps can help transform business models and/or allow countries to leapfrog past carbon emitting technologies, and will be officially presented at COP17. Transformative solutions often provide emissions reductions of 80% or more compared with business as usual and frequently depend on an underlying energy-efficient broadband infrastructure.

Q. Who can participate in the Transformative Step of the Day?

A. All delegates on-site in Durban are encouraged to participate. The main focus will be on government initiatives but transformative steps taken by other stakeholders will also be recognized.

Q. How can I participate?

A. Delegations, organizations and individuals at COP17 in Durban can submit their transformative steps through the mobile app or web-portal. Submissions will be accepted from December 5, 14:00 to December 8, 12:00 local Durban time. Even if you are not in Durban, interested parties can review the submissions and vote.

Q. Who can vote and how can I vote?

A. Anyone participating in or following COP17 can review the submissions and vote. Voting will be open between December 5, 14:00 and December 8, 12:00 local Durban time, with a possible extension depending on interest.

Q. When will the winning Transformative Step be announced?

A. The launch of the Transformative Step of the Day is on December 5, at 14.00 local Durban time. The daily winner will be announced December 6 – 8, at 14.00 local Durban time.

Coordinator:

Cooperating partners:

The web-platform and mobile app for Transformative Step of the Day are developed with the generous support of GeSI members Deutsche Telekom and Ericsson

Disclaimer

The “transformative steps” are sourced via submissions from stakeholders using the web-platform and mobile applications. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and contributors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of GeSI or any of the organisations behind the Transformative Step of the Day initiative.

The winners are selected based on an open voting system; the award does not in any way constitute an endorsement by any of the organisations behind the initiative.

The materials and the geographical designations in this application do not imply the expression of an opinion on the part of any organisation behind the initiative concerning the legal status of any country, territory, or area, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

Groups behind the initiative

Coordinator:

The Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI) www.gesi.org

Cooperating Partners:

Supporters:

See bottom half of the web portal for an updated list of supporters

Financial support for web-platform and mobile app:

The Initiative

  • At COP17 in Durban a multi-stakeholder coalition in cooperation with the UNFCCC secretariat will launch the award “Transformative Step of the Day” as a way to increase focus on transformative low-carbon solutions during the negotiations. The initiative builds on the “Guadalajara ICT Declaration for Transformative ICT Solutions”, which was launched during COP16 under the leadership of the Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI) and the Government of Mexico.

  • The award will be announced at a series of daily events during the second week of the global climate negotiations. It will identify and encourage initiatives during the negotiations that support accelerated uptake of transformative low-carbon solutions around the world. Delegations who have taken initiatives to support an accelerated uptake of transformative low-carbon solutions through proposals in the negotiations or other ways will be recognized for their efforts.

  • The award will be neutral in the sense that “winners” will be selected based on the input and “votes” by a wide variety of stakeholders including governments, business and civil society. The award will be facilitated through a mobile application and a web-portal, which will be used to keep track of different initiatives in support of transformative low-carbon solutions. Delegations will have the opportunity to provide information about their initiatives through the mobile application and web-portal. Based on this input, participants at the conference and stakeholders from around the world will be able to vote on the initiatives they think deserve to be the Transformative Step of the Day.

  • Transformative Step of the Day will help improve transparency and increase interest in the negotiations by allowing stakeholders from around the world to follow, rate, and comment on different initiatives in real-time. Clusters of companies and solution providers working to implement transformative low-carbon solutions will be able to comment on initiatives and express their views to policy-makers.

  • An event will be organized every day at 14:00 during the second week of the negotiations to present the results of the “Transformative Step of the Day”.

  • Transformative Step of the Day will run until Rio+20 and possibly longer depending on its success. It will not reward a step every day, but rather focus on key events. The possibility of a Transformative Step of the Month will also be explored.

Expected outcome

  • Support a shift from a “problem perspective” to a “solution perspective” and from “incremental improvements in existing systems” to “transformative solutions that allow services to be provided in innovative ways”.

  • Stimulate increased dialogue under the UNFCCC umbrella between clusters of solution providers and policy-makers, linking concrete initiatives to the climate negotiations.

  • Contribute to the recognition of the importance of transformative solutions in driving a low-carbon society and facilitating green growth in both developed and developing countries.

  • Increase engagement and participation of stakeholders usually excluded from the negotiation process through increased transparency and connectivity.

  • Facilitate the transfer of clean technologies and transformative solutions to developing countries (businesses) and those with economies in transition.

Objectives

  • Establish Transformative Step of the Day as part of the global climate negotiations as a way to increase focus on transformative low-carbon solutions and how they can be supported in the process.

  • Facilitate dialogue between policy-makers and solution providers on how transformative solutions can be promoted in the climate negotiations and beyond.

  • Ensure that transformative low-carbon solutions are recognized in relevant parts of the climate negotiations and that new initiatives to accelerate their uptake are supported.

  • Present concrete examples of transformative low-carbon solutions from around the world directly to the negotiators in order to demonstrate the need to support the accelerated uptake of such solutions.

Expected outcomes

  • Support a shift from a “problem perspective” to a “solution perspective” and from “incremental improvements in existing systems” to “transformative solutions that allow services to be provided in innovative ways”.

  • Stimulate increased dialogue under the UNFCCC umbrella between clusters of solution providers and policy-makers, linking concrete initiatives to the climate negotiations.

  • Contribute to the recognition of the importance of transformative solutions in driving a low-carbon society and facilitating green growth in both developed and developing countries.

  • Increase engagement and participation of stakeholders usually excluded from the negotiation process through increased transparency and connectivity.

  • Facilitate the transfer of clean technologies and transformative solutions to developing countries (businesses) and those with economies in transition.

Timeline

  • Starting 6 December 2011, a “winner” will be announced each day at 14:00. When possible the previous winner will announce the next winner.

  • The step that has the most "votes" and minimum number of "flags as unsustainable," in combination with highest rating by 12.00 that day is the winner. In order to ensure quality, the winner must have clarified in what way the step is transformative. As there are very different times for voting depending on when the step was submitted we are not restricted by the day a step was submitted, but the winner is based on the cumulative votes by that day.

  • Evaluation of the success of Transformative Step of the Day and follow-up with key stakeholders will take place after COP17. Then roles and responsibilities for future work will be decided.

  • The possibility of a Transformative Step of the Month has been discussed and will most likely be implemented.

  • In order to evaluate the long-term value of different steps, follow-up will take place in conjunction with COP18 and possibly also during Rio+20.

Background

  • The initiative "Transformative Step of the Day" was developed by Dennis Pamlin, 21st Century Frontiers. It is part of a series of initiatives that focus on transformative solutions, see http://transformative-solutions.net/ and http://transformative-applications.net/.

  • The initiative is to a great extent based on work with companies in China and India done under WWF's trade and investment programme, as well as the Low-Carbon Leaders project developed under the umbrella of UN Global Compact.

  • 21st Century Frontiers works extensively with leading ICT stakeholders. During 2010-11, Dennis Pamlin was global climate policy adviser for GeSI, where he developed the Guadalajara ICT Declaration for COP16 in Mexico and a benchmark for low-carbon ICT leadership. GeSi's interest in establishing the ICT sector as a solution provider makes the initiative a natural fit, and they agreed to coordinate the work at COP17. Deutsche Telekom and Ericsson were kind enough to provide resources so that a web-tool that also works on mobile devices, including a specific Android application, could be developed.

Transformative Steps and Solutions

Transformative Step

The award includes any activity in support of transformative low-carbon solutions, ranging from negotiation texts and side-events to investments and collaborative initiatives.

The main focus during Durban will be on government initiatives but transformative steps taken by other stakeholders will also be recognised.

Transformative solutions

Transformative low-carbon solutions are solutions that transform business models and/or allow countries to leapfrog past carbon-emitting technologies.

These solutions often provide emissions reductions of 80% or more compared with business as usual and often depend on an underlying energy-efficient broadband infrastructure. Examples of transformative solutions include:

  • e-commerce: E.g. farmers checking market prices in order to avoid unnecessary travels and ensure the best price and digital books and other media being downloaded – online commerce allows for reductions in physical transport and supports dematerialisation.

  • Virtual meetings and remote working: Remote col¬laboration will significantly reduce carbon emissions caused by travel.

  • Smart buildings: By managing light and heat systems, resource con¬sumption can be adapted to match demand in real-time. This also enables buildings to become net producers of renewable energy.

  • Sustainable lifestyles: By providing information and transparency, mobile applications can support more sustainable lifestyles where people are aware of their footprint and the positive and negative effect of different lifestyle choices. Transformative solutions can also help turn problems into opportunities, e.g., buildings that are net producers of renewable energy, zero-emitting electric transport solutions that also serve as back-up storage and base stations that produce renewable energy.

For more examples please see “examples of transformative solutions” at the bottom half of the webpage.

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